Your Life is Your Responsibility

Have you ever passed the buck, blamed someone else for something that happened in your life, or let something else do something that you probably should have done yourself? Don’t feel bad, we all have and do it, instead accept responsibility. By accepting responsibility we transfer accountability to ourselves. The outcomes of our situation now switches into our own hands – for all of the positive and not so positive things that happen in our lives.

  1. Know your values
  2. Establish your priorities
  3. Set Goals
  4. Accept responsibility (have versus be)
  5. Batch your time (STOP multitasking)

This week let’s talk about the same three questions we have been addressing. Why are they important, how do we set them, and where do they come into play with organization?

Why is Responsibility so Important

If you remember back to the original post this is being built upon, we talk about the fact that everything in the universe is made of energy. Energy attracts itself and in its same polar aspects. If you have ever heard of the Law of Attraction you know that what we put out into this world comes back to us. Which in turn makes us responsible for everything that happens to us. 

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The energy you give and receive is your responsibility.

When we can stop and recognize this simple fact it is that much easier to accept that responsibility and start making positive changes, including and especially stop responding to the things that happen to us. Let’s instead start using the notion that we are responsible for ourselves and what happens to us. This will let us move forward toward our goals, to pursue our passions and discover our greater purposes.

Accepting Responsibility is the gas that keeps your trip moving.

How Must We Accept Responsibility

One of the most difficult things about accepting responsibility is our mindset. We are used to blaming ourselves and others. Some of us regularly pass blame to others, while others of us are so hard on ourselves that we do not know how to accept responsibility for the good stuff and punish ourselves for the bad. 

The biggest suggestion on how to start changing that mindset and creating a positive habit around accepting responsibility for your life is to start considering what questions you currently are asking yourself and how you ask it? We then need to look at how we talk to ourselves — would someone who truly loves us ask these same questions? Would they ask them in the same way? When we realize that we need to reframe the question as if some one who loves us is asking us. 

Examples:

What did I do wrong? How did I mess this up?

Change to >> What can I take from this? Is there something I can learn from this?

“Opportunities are infinite; our options are boundless, and we always have the power to change our perspective on any life event, large or small.” – Daniela Brown

 

Where does Responsibility come into Play with Organization

When we are trying to get organized often times we try to blame the other people in our home for what is going on, but do we ever try to understand what is happening to cause the disorganization? Do we ever stop to think about what is happening to allow these circumstances to be created in our lives?

If we can readjust our thinking to look at things from a more loving stance to ourselves and others we can better understand why things are happening, and then modify or change them.

Here are some examples:

  1. We have not set a standard for what we expect around the house — not in a way that the other people living with us will understand. We expect people to have the same standards for clean and organized at us and just get angry or resentful when that is not the case
    1. FIX: Make it your responsibility to have each person write out their definitions – come to an agreement on what the standards and expectations are for the common areas. Considering how long can something be in the living room before it is an issue. Consequences for not follow the codes put into place. 
  2. We have ignored the needs of the other people in our home, and therefore, they are ignoring ours. 
    1. FIX: Check out 5 Love Languages for some interesting insight to how people function — whether or not you are romantically involved or not. There is also a quiz for kids. Considering that we normally “talk” in our love languages can you figure out what the other people in your home’s languages are? Make it your responsibility to try to do something nice for them that fits into that category.
  3. We do not know what we stand for and what we want out of life to help guide us in making the proper decisions. We just go with the motions and worry about things when they happen — sink comfortably into reactionary mode.
    1. FIX: There is already a whole in depth blog post about values that I highly encourage you to read. This is important because when we can make it our responsibility to find our purpose and work towards it every day we put ourselves in the drivers seat of our life. We stop waiting for other people to do what is right or what we think they should do.

I hope this post encourages you to start looking at responsibility a little bit differently. Responsibility should not have a negative connotation to it. We are here on this earth with the responsibility of making it the best life possible, of leaving our world in better shape than we received it, and we are responsible to help others do the same. Next time you are tempted to blame traffic for being late, your children for not picking up after themselves, or the weather for your droopy attitude I want you to stop and reconsider. 

What can I take away from this moment? How can I enrich this moment? Is there something I can learn? Is there something I can make better? How can I take responsibility of this moment and make it a positive one? Life will throw you a lot of rocks and a lot of lemons, but if you use those rocks you can get a lot more juice out of those lemons.

This live is yours for the making, what do you want to do with it?

 

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